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Easy-Riding Screen Legend Dennis Hopper Dies at Age 74

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CHICAGO – Beloved actor and legendary easy rider Dennis Hopper lost his long battle with prostate cancer this morning at age 74. With a career spanning over the last half-century, Hopper is best known for directing, co-writing and co-starring in 1969’s counterculture classic “Easy Rider”. The script awarded Hopper his first of two Oscar nominations (the other he received for his memorable supporting role in 1987’s “Hoosiers”).

Dennis Hopper
Dennis Hopper

The Hollywood icon died at his home in Venice Beach, Calif., on Saturday, May 29th, from complications due to prostate cancer. He was reportedly surrounded by his children at the time of his death. Hopper was diagnosed with the disease in late 2009, and by March of this year, the cancer had metastasized to his bones. That same month, Hopper made his last public appearance when he received his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Hopper began his career in television, and appeared in several popular shows including “Bonanza” and “Gunsmoke.” His film debut came with a bit part in 1955’s “Rebel Without a Cause.” He worked with some of the greatest directors in cinema history, including George Stevens, Francis Ford Coppola and David Lynch. Hopper had great success playing a variety of larger-than-life villains in films such as 1986’s “Blue Velvet” and “River’s Edge,” as well as 1994’s “Speed.” Other memorable film roles include his work in “Giant,” “Apocalypse Now,” “Rumble Fish” and “True Romance.”

After “Easy Rider,” Hopper directed six more feature films: 1971’s “The Last Movie,” 1980’s “Out of the Blue,” 1988’s “Colors,” 1990’s “Catchfire” and “The Hot Spot,” and 1994’s “Chaser.” Hopper’s last major role was on television in the Starz series “Crash.” His final two projects, a show-business satire, “The Last Film Festival,” and the animated adventure, “Alpha and Omega,” are due for release this year. Our condolences go out to his wife, Victoria, and his four children.

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By MATT FAGERHOLM
Staff Writer
HollywoodChicago.com

the padrino's picture

I think his wife left him

I think his wife left him soon as he found out he had cancer

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