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Tessa Thompson

Slideshow: ‘Creed’ Movie Premiere in Chicago on Nov. 12, 2015

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Michael B. Jordan portrays Adonis in ‘Creed.’

CHICAGO – “Creed” is poised to become a contender at the box office over the Thanksgiving weekend, and the new boxing film starring Sylvester Stallone as Rocky Balboa and Michael B. Jordan as Adonis Creed (son of ex-heavyweight champion and Rocky opponent Apollo Creed) is also in the buzz of the 2015 Oscar race. The film premiered in Chicago on Nov. 12th, 2015, with a Red Carpet event at Jones College Prep High School, where a mural was unveiled as part of the ceremony.

Film Review: ‘Creed’ is a Champion in the Rocky Balboa Legacy

CHICAGO – This is what happens when passionate filmmakers come into a known movie project – with an obvious love for the previous stories and characters – and create a new chapter that both evolves and honors its source. “Creed” does all of that, and gives the beloved Rocky Balboa one more time in the spotlight.

Interview: Director Justin Simien Reflects on ‘Dear White People’

CHICAGO – Some say, to use a FOX News term, that America is “post-racial.” The election of Barack Obama is supposed to have ended the debate on race, and any marginalization because of race. Of course, that is not possible in society and culture, and it’s articulated in writer/director Justin Simien’s new film, “Dear White People.”

Film Review: Racial Satire ‘Dear White People’ is Heated, Hilarious

CHICAGO – A new voice has everyone’s attention with the shaking-head comedy “Dear White People,” a necessary “Wake UP!” to a melting pot nation that still needs to get itself together, even if a black president is in the White House.

Blu-Ray Review: Tyler Perry’s ‘For Colored Girls’ Deserves Another Look

For Colored Girls

CHICAGO – Tyler Perry must have a bit of internal conflict. On one hand, he gets critically slammed for films that display little creative effort at all like “Madea Goes to Jail” or “Why Did I Get Married Too?” but those movies make money. Then he tries to do something clearly considered artistic with his adaptation of Ntozake Shange’s choreopoem “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf,” now truncated to simply “For Colored Girls” and recently available on Blu-ray and DVD, and it makes less than most of the films he’s directed.

Film Review: Cluttered, Melodramatic ‘For Colored Girls’ Never Comes Together

For Colored Girls
HollywoodChicago.com Oscarman rating: 2.5/5.0
Rating: 2.5/5.0

CHICAGO – Ntozake Shange’s choreopoem “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf” was a landmark event in 1974, giving voice to a segment of society rarely seen on the stage. It took 34 years for a filmmaker to tackle this remarkable work in film form and Tyler Perry’s “For Colored Girls” retains some of the inherent power of it source and features some strong performances in the process but never finds the narrative cohesion needed to translate it to modern movie audiences.

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    CHICAGO – Different isn’t bad and might be great, but you’d better have an irrefutable reason to change what was never broken. Campy being the only word to accurately convey this alternate-reality version of Sherlock Holmes with an original script, writer Greg Kramer and director Andrew Shaver try too hard to be different without ever figuring out why.

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