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AnnaLynne McCord

Blu-ray Review: AnnaLynne McCord Dazzles in Darkly Amusing ‘Excision’

Excision Blu-ray

CHICAGO – AnnaLynne McCord is the sort of actress whose face begs to be photographed. The camera can remain on her for an indefinite amount of time and manage to capture endless fascinating nuances. As someone who has never watched an episode of the rebooted “90210” series, I hadn’t seen McCord in anything until Richard Bates Jr.’s “Excision.” Now I consider myself a fan.

DVD Review: First Season of New ‘90210’ With Shenae Grimes, Jessica Stroup

90210

CHICAGO – I have to admit to looking forward to watching a few episodes of the new “90210,” now on DVD, in the same way that a lot of people look forward to a root canal. It’s not that I’m a loyalist to the original (unlike most of my generation, I barely saw the show), but most of the press surrounding the show’s original run on The CW annoyed me to no end and it felt like a blatant attempt to cash in on the success of “Gossip Girl” with another teeny-bopper soap opera.

Blu-Ray Review: Audiences Won’t Cheer For Lame ‘Fired Up’

Fired Up

CHICAGO – How desperate are you for laughs? If you rent all the straight-to-video comedies that come down the line, then “Fired Up” may have enough lines that hit the funny bone to warrant a rental. It’s certainly not as unbearable as some theatrical junk like “Disaster Movie” or “White Chicks,” but that’s doesn’t mean it’s worth your time.

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    Something always felt a bit out of place for me in Martin Scorsese’s brilliant “The King of Comedy”, just released on Blu-ray for the first time. I couldn’t put my finger on it but chalked it up to it being thematically ahead of its time in its investigation of the cult of personality that defines modern entertainment.

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