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Slideshow: 15-Image Gallery For ‘Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li’ With Kristin Kreuk

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Chun-Li (Kristin Kreuk) is a half-Caucasian/half-Asian beauty who gives up a life of privilege to become a street fighter, battling for those who cannot fight for themselves.

CHICAGO – This 15-image slideshow contains the official press images from the Twentieth Century Fox production of “Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li,” starring Kristin Kreuk, Chris Klein, Neal McDonough, Robin Shou, Moon Bloodgood, Josie Ho, Taboo, and Michael Clarke Duncan. Written by Justin Marks and directed by Andrzej Bartkowiak, the film opens on Friday, February 27th, 2009.

Synopsis: “Powerful forces are converging on the streets of Bangkok. They are warriors, some of whom possess extraordinary abilities, all of whom are determined to see their side prevail. Some fight for us; the others for unlimited power. Now, they are preparing for the ultimate battle - of terror versus beauty, light versus darkness, and good versus evil.

The forces of darkness are led by Bison (Neal McDonough), a crime boss of seemingly limitless power, and whose past holds a shocking secret. Bison’s syndicate, Shadaloo, is taking over the slums of the Thai capital, a task overseen by Balrog (Michael Clarke Duncan), a massively built enforcer and killer.

Also in Bison’s employ is the assassin Vega (Taboo, of the group The Black Eyed Peas), a masked talon-wielding warrior, whose weapon is tailor-made for slashing and stabbing attacks. Bison’s attache is the beautiful but deadly Cantana (Josie Ho).

These vivid characters and their world are long known to fans of the iconic videogame “Street Fighter,” which Capcom released in 1987. At the time, the 1-2 player game set a new precedent in two-dimensional interactive entertainment. In 1991, Capcom released to arcades, “Street Fighter II,” featuring new characters and fighting styles.

The games’ action and imaginatively staged fight scenes are a natural fit for a big screen translation, a fact embraced by noted producer and Hyde Park Entertainment chairman Ashok Amritraj - but only after his children, then aged 13 and 10, brought “Street Fighter” to his attention. “They really loved the game and told me I should make a movie based on it,” says Amritraj. “I have them to thank for Street Fighter: The Legend Of Chun-Li.””

You can click “Next” and “Previous” to scan through this slideshow or jump directly to individual photos with the captioned links below. All photos are credited to Patrick Brown and courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Street_Fighter_01: Chun-Li (Kristin Kreuk) is a half-Caucasian/half-Asian beauty who gives up a life of privilege to become a street fighter, battling for those who cannot fight for themselves.

  2. Street_Fighter_02: Chun-Li (Kristin Kreuk) prepares for the final, epic battle against the forces of darkness.

  3. Street_Fighter_03: Chun-Li (Kristin Kreuk) races through the streets of Bangkok to face her next challenge.

  4. Street_Fighter_04: Interpol cop Charlie Nash (Chris Klein) takes aim at a powerful crime boss he has been tracking all over the world.

  5. Street_Fighter_05: Gangland homicide detective Maya Sunee (Moon Bloodgood) is on the trail of the leader of a powerful criminal syndicate.

  6. Street_Fighter_06: High-powered weapons seem almost superfluous, given the massive frame and brutal strength of Balrog (Michael Clarke Duncan).

  7. Street_Fighter_07: Balrog (Michael Clarke Duncan), a massively built enforcer and killer, checks out his latest target.

  8. Street_Fighter_08: Bison (Neal McDonough) is a crime boss of seemingly limitless power, whose past holds a shocking secret.

  9. Street_Fighter_09: Cantana (Josie Ho) is the beautiful but deadly attache to a powerful crime boss.

  10. Street_Fighter_10: The kung fu master Gen (Robin Shou), once a feared criminal, now fights for the forces of good.

  11. Street_Fighter_11: The warrior/assassin Vega (Taboo) dons his signature mask as he goes into attack mode.

  12. Street_Fighter_12: Vega (Taboo) is a talon-wielding warrior/assassin, whose weapon is tailor-made for slashing and stabbing attacks.

  13. Street_Fighter_13: The street-fighting skills of Chun-Li (Kristin Kreuk) overpower some hoodlums.

  14. Street_Fighter_14: Chun-Li (Kristin Kreuk) trains with her master, Gen (Robin Shou).

  15. Street_Fighter_15: Director Andrzej Bartkowiak reviews a scene with Kristin Kreuk on the set of Street Fighter: The Legend Of Chun-Li.

    HollywoodChicago.com content director Brian Tallerico

    By BRIAN TALLERICO
    Content Director
    HollywoodChicago.com
    brian@hollywoodchicago.com

  16. Anonymous's picture

    I think this is going to be

    I think this is going to be rather fun. People get way too hung up about costumes and such.

    Kristin Kreuk is Chun Li's picture

    I don’t think this movie

    I don’t think this movie will be as bad as everyone say it is. It’s a martial arts film. Those never have great story lines to begin with.

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