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Film Review: ‘Blended’ is Lazy, Laugh-Free Catastrophe

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CHICAGO – Two things save “Blended” from getting a zero star review. Number one is the still palpable chemistry between Drew Barrymore and Adam Sandler. Number two is the occasional chuckle courtesy of Wendi McClendon-Covey as Barrymore’s business partner. Otherwise this is a barren laugh-free safari through Africa that doesn’t even have the benefit of Al Pacino trampling on his prestigious career for our amusement.

HollywoodChicago.com Oscarman rating: 1.0/5.0
Rating: 1.0/5.0

“Blended” never sinks to the astonishingly awful lows of “Jack And Jill” or “That’s My Boy.” Both of those films had ideas I couldn’t believe had ever made it to the silver screen. But I won’t soon forget them, as hard as I may try. “Blended” is both painfully unfunny and bland and boring.

I feel a little sorry for Drew Barrymore’s career these days, because the closest thing she’s got to a dependable leading man is Adam Sandler. He’s certainly no Tom Hanks. Sandler, as usual, is clad in outfits that even George Constanza would find to be the epitome of apathy and hopelessness. Sweat pants are almost considered formal gear. This is Sandler and Barrymore’s third film together and you can see the reasons why. When they’re together her flightiness comes off as charming rather than insipid. And his overgrown man-child takes a few steps towards maturity even as Sandler himself proceeds firmly into middle-age. “Blended” also re-teams them with their “Wedding Singer” director Frank Coraci, but the best they can manage is to make the film blandly awful instead of an audience endurance test.

“Blended” opens everywhere on May 23rd. Featuring Adam Sandler, Drew Barrymore, Kevin Nealon, Bella Thorne, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Shaquille O’Neill, Terry Crews and Joel McHale. Written by Clare Sera and Ivan Menchell. Directed by Frank Coraci. Rated “PG-13”

StarContinue reading for Spike Walter’s full review of “Blended”

Drew Barrymore, Adam Sandler
Lauren (Drew Barrymore) and Jim (Adam Sandler) in ‘Blended’
Photo credit: Warner Bros.

StarContinue reading for Spike Walter’s full review of “Blended”

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