HollywoodChicago.com RSS   Facebook   HollywoodChicago.com on Twitter   Free Giveaway E-mail   

Film Review: Great Performance Anchors Devastating ‘The Attack’

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly versionE-mail page to friendE-mail page to friendPDF versionPDF version
Average: 5 (2 votes)

CHICAGO – “The Attack,” opening this week at the Landmark Century in Chicago, is a melancholy, mournful piece about an unimaginable tragedy and a man faced with the realization that he may not know the truth about the woman he loved. It’s an accomplished drama anchored by an understated, captivating performance from an actor who fills nearly every frame of every scene. It is about an attack not just on innocent lives but a man’s very understanding of his family. It’s a strong alternative to blockbuster fare this weekend.

HollywoodChicago.com Oscarman rating: 4.0/5.0
Rating: 4.0/5.0

Ali Suliman plays Amin Jaafari, a successful Palestinian doctor working and living in Tel Aviv. On the same night he accepts an award for his accomplishments, he is called into deal with a waking nightmare. A bomb has gone off, killing over a dozen people, many of them children, and this doctor has to deal with the bloody aftermath. The horror becomes significantly worse when it’s revealed that his wife Siham (Reymond Amsalem) was not only killed in the attack but her wounds are consistent with that of a suicide bomber. Could the wife he thought was visiting her grandfather really been at the heart of a terrorist attack? Can we really live with someone we know so little about that they could end up a mass murderer to some and a martyr to others?

StarRead Brian Tallerico’s full review of “The Attack” in our reviews section.

Naturally, the revelation sends Jaafari spinning. He refuses to believe it at first and the cops (led by the fascinating Uri Javriel, popping up everywhere lately in films like “The Dark Knight Rises” and “Byzantium”) push Amin to admit that he was a part of the plan of the attack. Not only did your wife kill 17 people but you knew about it. The investigation seems to clear Amin but he’s still unconvinced that there isn’t more to the story. He heads off to Nablus to figure out what could have turned his wife into a terrorist or discover that the truth of the attack is not what he has been told.

Jaafari, through the remarkably subtle performance from Suliman, becomes a fascinating character in the context of peace in the Middle East in general. Writer/director Ziad Doueiri, working from a novel by Yasmina Khadra, gets at the deep emotional currents and complex relationship caught up in decades of turmoil between Arabs and Israelis. Jaafari is a man personally impacted both in his family and in the dead bodies of children he tried to save. Other than a few bouts of rage and confusion, Amin, like so many people on both sides, is trying to figure out how to move forward, dealing with both Israelis and Palestinians in his quest for answers.

StarContinue reading for Brian Tallerico’s full “The Attack” review.

“The Attack” stars Ali Suliman, Reymond Amsalem, and Uri Javriel. It was written and directed by Ziad Doueiri. It opens at the Landmark Century in Chicago on July 26, 2013.

The Attack
The Attack
Photo credit: Cohen Media Group

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Hot stories on the Web


User Login

Free Giveaway Mailing

TV, DVD, BLU-RAY & THEATER REVIEWS

  • Happy Christmas

    CHICAGO – “Drinking Buddies” director Joe Swanberg’s latest release of the same star wattage is “Happy Christmas,” an even lower-fi story than the Olivia Wilde beer comedy, steered even more by the casting that it was able to assemble. However, with this movie Swanberg doesn’t so much worry about having a story that could be confused with a more mainstream romantic comedy if it were to have a bigger budget.

  • reno 911 front.png

    CHICAGO – The oughts was the era of the workplace mock-doc comedy, with shows like “The Office” and “Reno 911!” born into a time where TV viewers were excited to see see fake realities about the crumminess of a job. While this series has been available in separate season collections previously, “Reno 911!” is now available in a complete series set, one that boasts a grand amount of special features content in spite of some lacking comedy in the actual show.

Advertisement


HollywoodChicago.com on Twitter

archive

HollywoodChicago.com Top Ten Discussions
tracker