HollywoodChicago.com RSS   Facebook   HollywoodChicago.com on Twitter   Free Giveaway E-mail   

Film Review: Strong Ensemble Carries Funny ‘Think Like a Man’

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly versionE-mail page to friendE-mail page to friendPDF versionPDF version
No votes yet

CHICAGO – Tim Story’s ‘Think Like a Man’ can be a frustrating film but the overall likeability of the cast and the inclusion of some of the often-missing elements from relationship movies (like chemistry and believable friendship dynamics) overcome the movie’s flaws. It’s a movie that could have been better but works on its own terms – it’s funny, clever, and even sweet. It’s not going to change the romantic comedy landscape but so many films in this slumping genre fail spectacularly and no one can say that about “Think Like a Man.”

HollywoodChicago.com Oscarman rating: 3.5/5.0
Rating: 3.5/5.0

Based on Steve Harvey’s hit book “Act Like a Woman, Think Like a Man,” this is yet another film about the battle of the sexes in relationships but it doesn’t minimize or demonize either side like so many of these movies typically do. There have been dozens of male-driven raunchy comedies that turn women into the enemy or, worse, the idiot. And there have been “chick flicks” that make men out to be villains or total morons. “Think Like a Man” respects both sides as it tries to illuminate the differences between the sexes without reducing them for the lowest common denominator.

StarRead Brian Tallerico’s full review of “Think Like a Man” in our reviews section.

Harvey appears as himself, often dispensing bits of relationship advice from his book, first via an in-movie appearance on a talk show and later in some truly bizarre straight-to-camera bits that should have been cut. Harvey’s appearance selling his book inspires a group of women to change the way they’ve been playing the game and, wouldn’t you know it, the entire group happens to be in or about to enter relationships with a group of male friends. In Steve Harvey’s world, every woman on Earth read his book and put his advice into play.

The men at the center of “Think Like a Man” are a group of friends who have a regular basketball game together and often retire to the same bar for drinks – loudmouth Cedric (a hysterical Kevin Hart), earnest dreamer Dominic (Michael Ealy), man-child Jeremy (Jerry Ferrara), mama’s boy Michael (Terrence J), player Zeke (Romany Malco), and comic relief Bennett (Gary Owen). Four of the guys will encounter relationship issues guided by the all-seeing advice of Steve Harvey. The player meets the beautiful Mya (Meagan Good), a girl who’s tired of cheap sexual encounters and is going to make him wait to “get the cookie.” The guy who values his “Lord of the Rings” toys more than his resume finds his world shattered when his girlfriend Kristen (Gabrielle Union) decides it’s time for him to grown up. The mama’s boy meets a single mother (Regina Hall) who might get him to finally cut the ties to home. Finally, the broke dreamer pretends to be something he’s not to get the confident Lauren (Taraji P. Henson).

StarContinue reading for Brian Tallerico’s full “Think Like a Man” review.

“Think Like a Man” stars Michael Ealy, Jerry Ferrara, Meagan Good, Regina Hall, Kevin Hart, Taraji P. Henson, Terrence J, Jenifer Lewis, Romany Malco, Gary Owen, and Gabrielle Union. It was directed by Tim Story and is rated PG-13. It opens on April 20, 2012.

Think Like a Man
Think Like a Man
Photo credit: Screen Gems

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Hot stories on the Web


User Login

Free Giveaway Mailing

TV, DVD, BLU-RAY & THEATER REVIEWS

  • Bad Words

    Looming over “Bad Words” is the potential it could have had, as is, were it released ten years ago. With its focus of R-rated behavior poking at the projected innocence of children, along with the couple of chromosomes that keep Bateman’s Trilby from being a Vince Vaughn character, this movie is certainly a product of the comedies that have sculpted out the manchild story in the past decade.

  • Winter's Tale

    The theatrical poster for “Winter’s Tale,” after promising that “It’s not a true story, it’s a love story,” made a large demand from its viewers at the bottom: “This Valentine’s Day, Believe In Miracles.” While there is indeed a difference between filmmaking and marketing, it is hard to not imagine writer/director Akiva Goldsman whispering “believe in miracles” into the ear of every executive who helped “Winter’s Tale” come to life, immediately after throwing glitter on them.

Advertisement


HollywoodChicago.com on Twitter

archive

HollywoodChicago.com Top Ten Discussions
tracker