HollywoodChicago.com RSS   Facebook   HollywoodChicago.com on Twitter   Free Giveaway E-mail   

Film Review: ‘Salt’ With Angelina Jolie Suffers From Lack of Flavor

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly versionE-mail page to friendE-mail page to friendPDF versionPDF version
No votes yet

CHICAGO – Perhaps the creators of “Salt” took the potential double meaning of its title a bit too seriously because the film has been overloaded with one flavor at the expense of the variety that could have turned this well-done action movie into something a bit more memorable. Angelina Jolie is great and the film is undeniably expertly made but it’s also shockingly lacking in personality or moments to make it register as more than just an extended chase scene.

HollywoodChicago.com Oscarman rating: 3.0/5.0
Rating: 3.0/5.0

“Salt” is admittedly refreshing in its economy. In a season when so many films fall victim to the bloat that expands action films past the two-hour mark, it’s rare to see an efficient, tightly-edited, expertly-paced thriller like “Salt.” The film very rarely lets up on the gas pedal and there’s something to be said for its technical accomplishments alone.

StarRead Brian Tallerico’s full review of “Salt” in our reviews section.

On the other hand, “Salt” plays almost like a mid-season episode of “24” in that it has a similar, franchise-starting non-ending and doesn’t have the necessary dramatic weight to allow the audience to really give a damn about anything that’s happening on the big screen. Most of what happens is completely illogical and there’s simply not enough personality here to elevate the action into something more powerful like we’ve seen in films like “The Bourne Ultimatum” or “Casino Royale.” “Salt” is nowhere near the accomplishment of those super-spy ancestors and it’s disappointing because it’s hard to shake the feeling that it could have been.

We’re introduced to Evelyn Salt (Angelina Jolie) bloodied, half-naked, and with a torturer pouring gasoline down her throat. She’s being held in a North Korean prison and denying that she’s even a spy. The scene is an important introduction because it plants the seed in the audience’s mind that this woman is willing to face any duress and not blow her cover.

StarContinue reading for Brian Tallerico’s full “Salt” review.

“Salt” stars Angelina Jolie, Liev Schreiber, and Chiwetel Ejiofor. It was written by Kurt Wimmer and directed by Phillip Noyce. It is rated PG-13 and opens on July 23rd, 2010.

Angelina Jolie stars as Evelyn Salt
Angelina Jolie stars as Evelyn Salt
Photo credit: Sony Pictures

nice-jem's picture

Good day!

For me, the latest of movie of Angelina Jolie is really amazing. I understood the whole story and since the story is all about her as an agent and a spy. Because of the very good story,it can have part II to make and continue the new secret agendum or agenda of Evelyn Salt.Filipino people who watched and even the Korean nationals loved it.We think that it’s not really enough because we want more.Honestly, other people are saying that it’s really amazing!

About the scene and actions or stunts that she used or made were so good!Though other actors and actresses can do so but Angelina Jolie has an IMAGE which is more real that them.Well,we like it so much. The plot and settings are so comprehensive.So my rating is 5.0 out of 5.0.

Thank you…

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent spam submissions.
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Hot stories on the Web

User Login

Free Giveaway Mailing


  • Sherlock Holmes with David Arquette (teaser)

    CHICAGO – Different isn’t bad and might be great, but you’d better have an irrefutable reason to change what was never broken. Campy being the only word to accurately convey this alternate-reality version of Sherlock Holmes with an original script, writer Greg Kramer and director Andrew Shaver try too hard to be different without ever figuring out why.

  • Merry Widow, The

    CHICAGO – Standing up at the Lyric Opera house in Chicago is unusual before a show. But in this case, it was the night after a tragedy, and the operetta “The Merry Widow” – set in Paris, France, in 1905 – was about to unfold. The orchestra struck up La Marseillaise, a reminder that we’ll always have Paris.


HollywoodChicago.com on Twitter


HollywoodChicago.com Top Ten Discussions