HollywoodChicago.com RSS   Facebook   HollywoodChicago.com on Twitter   Free Giveaway E-mail   

‘The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters’ is Tour de Force For Arcade Dweebs

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly versionE-mail page to friendE-mail page to friendPDF versionPDF version
Average: 4.9 (8 votes)

Rating: 4.5/5CHICAGO – There’s nothing more boring than sitting at a bar and watching someone manhandle the joysticks of classic arcade games like Ms. Pac-Man or Donkey Kong.

On the other hand, Seth Gordon’s feature-length documentary “The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters” about obsessive arcade gamers could possibly be the most entertaining thing you could do on a Saturday night.

Billy Mitchell in The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters
Billy Mitchell (center) in “The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters”.
Photo courtesy of Picturehouse

According to experts in the world of video games, Donkey Kong is the tour de force. Only three people in the history of the game have reached the kill screen, which is the point on the final level of the game where the machine runs out of memory and kills Mario.

One of these is the so-called greatest gamer of all time: Billy Mitchell. He holds a record-perfect score on Pac-Man, the highest recorded score on Donkey Kong Jr. and, since 1982, the highest unchallenged score on the original Donkey Kong.

Steve Wiebe in The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters
Steve Wiebe with his son in “The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters”.
Photo courtesy of Picturehouse

Enter Steve Wiebe. He’s the Rocky of the story to Mitchell’s Apollo Creed.

A middle-school science teacher who is described as a “perpetual loser,” Wiebe is humble and sweet in every way that Mitchell is boisterous and arrogant. With the support of his family, Wiebe dedicates himself to conquering Kong.

While most people play these games for recreation, this documentary studies the subculture of people who measure their worth by the ability to master them. In that, the film is about the very nature of competition and sportsmanship.

Walter Day and Steve Wiebe in The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters
Walter Day (left) and Steve Wiebe in “The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters”.
Photo courtesy of Picturehouse

The people – most of whom look like candidates for “The 40-Year-Old Virgin 2” – give the picture its warmth and humor.

You see the sincerity of referee Walter Day (who compares video games to a Zen lifestyle), the questioned motives of Roy “Mr. Awesome” Shildt (who doesn’t want to see Wiebe get “chumpatized”) and the patience and understanding of Wiebe’s wife (the “First Lady of Donkey Kong”).

Steve Wiebe in The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters
Steve Wiebe in his garage in “The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters”.
Photo courtesy of Picturehouse

Masterfully portraying the competitive tension comparable to any great sports movie, the audience hangs on to the emotional roller-coaster as the underdog goes for the glory of a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records.

While the picture won’t make you want to leave the theater and head for the arcade, it will make you question how hard you would work to make your dream – no matter how silly – a reality.

By Dustin Levell
Senior Staff Writer
HollywoodChicago.com

© 2007 Dustin Levell, HollywoodChicago.com

Publisher’s note: This film’s rating of 4.5 ties for the highest recorded on HollywoodChicago.com. It has a short run in Chicago through Aug. 30 at Landmark Century Centre.

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent spam submissions.
60 - 41 =
Solve this math question and enter the solution with digits. E.g. for "two plus four = ?" enter "6".

User Login

Free Giveaway Mailing

TV, DVD, BLU-RAY & THEATER REVIEWS

  • Everybody, Brown Paper Box Co

    CHICAGO – When is the last time a stage play, based in an intimate setting, made you think about your life, death, and the destiny inherent in both? “Everybody,” staged by Brown Paper Box Co. (BPBCo), is such a play, and the energetic aura and sense of surprise that the show contains is soul soothing wonder. The show has various evening/matinee performances at the Pride Arts Center in Chicago run through August 12, 2018. Click here for more details, including ticket information.

  • Not One Batu

    CHICAGO – The State of Hawaii may be one of the most misunderstood in America. Because of its reputation as a tourist mecca, the fact that native peoples live and work there like any other place is hard to imagine. Also unimaginable is the drug use of island residents, but playwright and Hawaiian native Hannah li-Epstein wrote about it in her stage play “Not One Batu,” now in its Premiere Chicago run at the Berger Park Coach House through July 28th, 2018. For more information, including tickets, click here.

Advertisement



HollywoodChicago.com on Twitter

HollywoodChicago.com Top Ten Discussions
tracker